Category Archives: History

A ‘Day of Infamy’

Today marks the 76th anniversary of the attack by the Japanese Imperial Navy on the US of A’s naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared the Monday after the attack:

Yesterday, December 7th, 1941 — a date which will live in infamy — the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.”

The attack on Pearl Harbor was the oomph that helped push the US into World War II on the side of the Allies. But it was not the only factor, there were many more as well.

Not only did the Japanese launch an attack at Pearl Harbor that peaceful Sunday morning, but that same day attacked Guam, Wake Island, The Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand and Midway.

Eventually General Douglas MacArthur would utter the immortal words, “I shall return,” as he fled The Philippines as the Japanese occupied.

Thousands of American sailors and soldiers lost their lives that sleepy morning. Battleships still lie in rest in the harbor, the watery grave for American lives lost.

In recent years, commemoration of Pearl Harbor Day has seemed to fade. Perhaps in part it can be attributed to the fact that more and more of whom Tom Brokaw called, “The Greatest Generation”, die off. The memory of that tragic day begins to fade as well.

An article detailing 5 myths about Pearl Harbor at TwinCities.com from a few years ago noted:

The attack on Pearl Harbor awoke America from its isolationist slumber and bolstered its charge into the Pacific war, but it did not spur entry into the European war. That happened when Nazi Germany and fascist Italy declared war on the United States on Dec. 11, compelling Roosevelt to respond in kind – thus committing the United States to a world war.

http://twincities.com/opinion/ci_19476298

From the Cornfield, I am hoping those who read this will stop and remember those sailors and soldiers whose lives were lost.

To “The Greatest Generation“, we salute your service, your action and how you kept the world “safe for democracy.”

Homer Powell lost in World War II

They came home: Luther, Herman, Wesley Powell

The Many Uses of the ‘Grocery Cart’


LOL, strange title, story? The grocery cart was invented on June 4th, 1937 by Sylvan Goldman. The owner of “Humpty Dumpty” stores in Oklahoma. But as you see by the picture its uses have been used for many reasons far from a loaf of bread and gallon of milk. This picture here is the most unique of all I think. It was used by a trucking company that had a steam jenny and they used it for extending the hose. Quite creative. 🙂

Historic Gas Pumps!


Yesterday I caught a few images in history.
The first 2 on this page were at a local business we contract to.
The 3rd one, the Gulf pump I caught a few years ago.
Things have certainly changed since I was a kid. Gas, 25 cents a gallon, wow!

New York History


Back in the days!
A bit of nostalgia here. I saw this on a run yesterday.
Man how time flies!

Sergeant Corbin Logsdon & Striker

Its quite an honor having a relative in this position. Thanks for your service.

And Happy Veterans Day!

Salute ~ To Those Who Served

From the Desert with feet planted firmly in the Cornfield

Tomorrow, we stop and give thanks for all those who have served the nation in uniform, protecting the freedoms we hold so dear. Some gave the ultimate sacrifice of their lives in order to ensure that we have the life we so proudly proclaim.

Their sacrifice is honored with each election where not by coup, but by ordinary Americans casting a ballot and choosing those who will lead and represent them. The power and authority of those officials are transferred from one elected official to the next, from the precinct level to the highest office in the land, the Presidency, without the need for troops in the streets because of those who answered the call to duty, honor and service.

The ability to vote, the ability to choose, the ability to speak our minds, the ability to worship or not worship, the ability to write these words without fear, the ability to work, to succeed, to fail, to rise above our circumstances, all of this we owe to those men and women who fought for peace, justice and freedom.

None of our liberties came without cost and thus we owe a debt to each of our veterans and to those who still serve.

Beginning at 11 a.m. on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918 with the treaty signed ending the “Great War” between the Triple Entente and the Allies, the veterans are now honored each year as Veteran’s Day, though initially Armistice Day.

On a more personal note:

Normandy Award to Luther C. Powell

In those dark days following the sneak attack by the Imperial Japanese Navy on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, four brothers from Nashville, Brown County, Indiana lined up at the recruiting office and joined the US Navy. These four brothers went off to save the world for democracy both in the European Theater and in the Pacific.

Homer Powell lost in World War II

Three made it back home at the close of World War II. The one who didn’t return was my Uncle Homer. My grandfather and his other two brothers, Herman and Wesley, came home, but changed, never to be the same.

First Sergeant Jack L. Hollifield

My step-father, a fresh-faced kid from Sullivan County, Indiana didn’t wait to be drafted. He went to the recruiting office and signed up to be a soldier for Uncle Sam. He survived, though wounded once, three tours in Viet Nam. He remained in the US Army to retire after 20 years as an E-8 First Sergeant.

USN veteran Allen Powell

My grandfather’s only son, my uncle, later followed in his father’s footsteps and sailed off on the ocean blue with the Navy. He served around the world, then came home.

Allen's Honorable Discharge

All of these veterans within my own family are now gone, but not forgotten.

AFC Mark after USAF Basic Training

Their service made it possible for me to join the US Air Force in 1976. My time was spent at Grissom AFB, right here in the Cornfield.

It also allowed my step-brother, John Hollifield, a few years later to join the US Army. Unfortunately, we lost him in a drunk driving incident after he did his duty and was home.

US Army vet John Hollifield, victim of a DUI driver

The sacrifice of my grandfather, great-uncles and step-father also allowed all of us to still be living in the land of the free and the home of the brave.

This is why I am always appreciative of those who choose to serve in our military. This is why I always have an empathy and a connection to the families left behind to keep the home fires burning to shine the light to lead our service members home.

Each November 11th, we celebrate, not just the veterans of that long ago war that was to be the war to end all wars, but the holiday has evolved to celebrate and to show appreciation for all who have served our great nation and those who continue to serve.

From the Cornfield, veterans, I salute you and thank you!

The Real Frank James – The Glorified Outlaw

https://truewestmagazine.com/frank-james/

Old Gas Stations


As many of us here remember, the old Mom and Pop stores, the town barber shop, plus many more things. In my travels I still see some of the old gas stations from the 20th century.
Do you remember this gas station?
Much has changed since those days, great memories.

Western Writer

https://medium.com/@Louis_LAmour/hard-work-and-a-library-card-ef4a65bbe92b

True West: Wanted

https://truewestmagazine.com/wanted-dead-alive-2/