Category Archives: History

A Piece of ‘Railroad’ History


While on a run yesterday south of Rochester I came across this old piece of railroad history. The “Pullman” sleeping car.
In rail history, the first sleeping car was built I believe around the 1830s. In 1865 George Pullman started his own firm for building these cars. Hence. “The Pullman” car.
I may add, that at one point all the sleeping cars’ employees were black. The conditions and hours these men went through were rough. They did form their own union.

Eclipsing America

The last time a total eclipse was seen in the US of A was during Woodrow Wilson’s time in the Oval Office back in 1918.
It was the late 1280s when a total eclipse of the sun traversed the Americas the way today’s eclipse traveled.
Next time will be April of 2024, a scant seven years from now.
Question is:
Will President Donald Trump eclipse the headlines about the sun and the moon when he addresses the nation tonight at 9 o’clock with his Southern Asian Plan and what to do about Afghanistan?
The US continues to be bogged down in its longest war in the Graveyard of Empires.

Ships

This is a replica of the Nina it was spotted by me south of Hannibal, Missouri on the Mississippi River headed for Wisconsin.

The Caboose and Its Life

http://citizenjournalistslive.com/2017/08/20/possible-new-addition-to-rochester-c_j_l-bureau/comment-page-1/#comment-35689

The “Caboose
They were started in the 1800’s. The little red car at the end of the train.
They were originally constructed in a makeshift, cheap way. A small cabin like structure was built on a railroad flat bed car.
Then as railroads progressed, expanded, the Caboose was modified and improved. The Caboose after modification became a custom shelter so to speak for the “conductor” and “brakeman” of the train.
It had a kitchen, sitting area, and bunks. And then with further modifications, it had an upper window built in, so the crew could see forward. I call it a “crowsnest” of a train. This was constructed due to boxcars being much higher and blocking the front of the train to the conductor, brakeman, lookout man.
By the time the 1920’s rolled around, there were 34,000 Cabooses in use on American railroads in the United States. But then like all things, things change with “time” and technology.
A small device which cost only a few thousand dollars could be attached to the last car on the train which could give the engineer all the information he needed to operate the train safely. Hence, the “Caboose” faded.
The Caboose’s life ended during the 1980’s.

How baby carriages have changed.




Like all things with “time”, they change. You name it, generally they change. Cars,trucks,tractors,computers,washers,dryers,etc..
This week while on assignment, I spotted an old old baby carriage. It was posted to C_J_L. Then while doing other work, I came across a few other baby carriages that were part of past stories I did. I noticed a change and wanted to share it.

Moonshiners

These shoes worn by moonshiners during prohibition so they couldn’t be tracked.

 

Antique Baby Carriage


Yes folks, while on a run today, I saw this piece of history. As you see, it’s in great shape for its age. I have no idea how old it is, but I would say at least 50 years old for starters.

From the 20th Century – A Real ‘Steam Shovel’


These days machines like this are designed much different and are called “excavators“. ¬†However, back in the day, these were called “steam shovels“. They were actually powered by steam.
As you can see by the sign, it has gone on the national registry.

Old German’ Neighborhood


Folks on behalf of R_Logston, from our Missouri C_J_L Bureau due to technical difficulties he’s having, he asked me to share this with our viewers at C_J_L.
The picture is from the old German neighborhood in Bethel, Missouri.

Old Country ‘Stone” Bridge


While on a run yesterday I remembered this bridge. I have been meaning to shoot a picture of it but the timing wasn’t right. But yesterday it was. This is on Route 39 in Avon, New York. It has held its age quite well. I enjoy seeing old bridges, especially the old iron ones.