Category Archives: Photo Journalism

Railroad Graffiti


Graffiti is an art “unique” in itself. We have all seen artists of various interests. And then there are the “railroad” graffiti painters. I see this all the time when I’m on the road.

Unique Fireplace, Chimney – What Is Missing?

I was on a run today and caught this piece of masonry art.
But what is missing?
The house, the barn, the shop?  LOL
After putting a lot of thought to it, I think maybe it’s the homemade stove,  grill, oven for the Heyseed family up yonder in the St. Lou area.
Heyseed, as you know, recently joined C_J_L and is the Manager of the Missouri Bureau.
The Heyseed family fixes some mighty fine “viddles” on Sunday!

Old Railroad Cars









From the engineer and his trainee, to the Pullman sleeping car (old one) to the Pullman sleeper remolded into a library, the boxcar, caboose, the depot and a railroad bridge. Railroads are and have played an important part of our lives.

Last Steel Banister Bridge Left in Adair County, Missouri

https://m.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=404358316357599&id=100003503038597&set=a.186138484846251.38060.100003503038597&source=43

The Mississippi

Windy and rough waters. Did see a paddle wheel out today.

Old Rochester Subway System


Here’s a picture of one of my early photo projects years back, people. This is real Rochester history. Today it’s as you see it. This became a home to “homeless” through the years. I think now it has somewhat stopped due to the authorities. But people of sorts still go there.

The Caboose and Its Life

http://citizenjournalistslive.com/2017/08/20/possible-new-addition-to-rochester-c_j_l-bureau/comment-page-1/#comment-35689

The “Caboose
They were started in the 1800’s. The little red car at the end of the train.
They were originally constructed in a makeshift, cheap way. A small cabin like structure was built on a railroad flat bed car.
Then as railroads progressed, expanded, the Caboose was modified and improved. The Caboose after modification became a custom shelter so to speak for the “conductor” and “brakeman” of the train.
It had a kitchen, sitting area, and bunks. And then with further modifications, it had an upper window built in, so the crew could see forward. I call it a “crowsnest” of a train. This was constructed due to boxcars being much higher and blocking the front of the train to the conductor, brakeman, lookout man.
By the time the 1920’s rolled around, there were 34,000 Cabooses in use on American railroads in the United States. But then like all things, things change with “time” and technology.
A small device which cost only a few thousand dollars could be attached to the last car on the train which could give the engineer all the information he needed to operate the train safely. Hence, the “Caboose” faded.
The Caboose’s life ended during the 1980’s.

How baby carriages have changed.




Like all things with “time”, they change. You name it, generally they change. Cars,trucks,tractors,computers,washers,dryers,etc..
This week while on assignment, I spotted an old old baby carriage. It was posted to C_J_L. Then while doing other work, I came across a few other baby carriages that were part of past stories I did. I noticed a change and wanted to share it.